PLANTING AND BUILDING: Money

“The primary preparation to make Torah our profession… is to avoid debt except under the most extraordinary circumstances (like saving a life). We must teach our children that before they spend they must evaluate whether Hashem approves of this expenditure. The first step in making this assessment is to ask: ‘Do I have money to pay for this?’ The child must accustom himself to thinking: ‘If I have money, then I may buy; but if I don’t have money, then I shouldn’t buy.”

-Rabbi Shlomo Wolbe, PLANTING AND BUILDING, p. 70

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2 thoughts on “PLANTING AND BUILDING: Money

  1. RAFI — my comment:  Yet we find an American Jewish Community that drowns itself in debt for the gaudiest jewelry, biggest houses, trendiest designer accessories, newest phones, TVs, automobiles, and — of course — the most prestigious, liberal Universities. There, Jewish youngsters desperately try to “blend in” with their very non-Jewish classmates, learn anti-Israel and anti-American views from their peers, from BDS, and from their tenured “professors”.  They live amidst gross immorality where modesty is mocked.  Jewish parents (and even the young students) will happily run up mountains of debt, in order to produce a generation of doctors and engineers who have no idea what happened at Sinai; a generation who won’t bother to buy matzoh on Pesach because they don’t even own a Jewish calendar; a generation who will celebrate both Christmas and Kwaanza but will have no concept of the meaning of Hanukah.  Debt will be a sign of status for them.  The more credit cards one has maxed out, the greater one’s standing in the community.  Yet, to save the very souls of their children by sending them to a Torah Day School? that is something they seemingly cannot afford.  After all, they are already in so much debt!  

    From: 60 Seconds of Torah To: strange_quark@yahoo.com Sent: Tuesday, February 13, 2018 8:42 AM Subject: [New post] PLANTING AND BUILDING: Money #yiv8825636469 a:hover {color:red;}#yiv8825636469 a {text-decoration:none;color:#0088cc;}#yiv8825636469 a.yiv8825636469primaryactionlink:link, #yiv8825636469 a.yiv8825636469primaryactionlink:visited {background-color:#2585B2;color:#fff;}#yiv8825636469 a.yiv8825636469primaryactionlink:hover, #yiv8825636469 a.yiv8825636469primaryactionlink:active {background-color:#11729E;color:#fff;}#yiv8825636469 WordPress.com | Rafi Mollot posted: “”The primary preparation to make Torah our profession… is to avoid debt except under the most extraordinary circumstances (like saving a life). We must teach our children that before they spend they must evaluate whether Hashem approves of this expendit” | |

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  2. Yet we find an American Jewish Community that drowns itself in debt for the gaudiest jewelry, biggest houses, trendiest designer accessories, newest phones, TVs, automobiles, and — of course — the most prestigious, liberal Universities. There, Jewish youngsters desperately try to “blend in” with their very non-Jewish classmates, learn anti-Israel and anti-American views from their peers, from BDS, and from their tenured “professors”. They live amidst gross immorality where modesty is mocked. Jewish parents (and even the young students) will happily run up mountains of debt, in order to produce a generation of doctors and engineers who have no idea what happened at Sinai; a generation who won’t bother to buy matzoh on Pesach because they don’t even own a Jewish calendar; a generation who will celebrate both Christmas and Kwaanza but will have no concept of the meaning of Hanukah. Debt will be a sign of status for them. The more credit cards one has maxed out, the greater one’s standing in the community. Yet, to save the very souls of their children by sending them to a Torah Day School? that is something they seemingly cannot afford. After all, they are already in so much debt!

    Like

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